Knee Ligaments and ACL Injury

Knee Ligaments and ACL Injury

Knee Ligaments and ACL Injury

Knee Ligament Injury Treatment

Sports Injury and Recovery

Knee Ligament Injury and Treatment


One of the more common injuries to the knee ligament occur as an ACL injury. This is when the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee gets torn or sprained during physical activity. At the time of injury, it is common to hear a popping localised in the knee, at which point rapid swelling and pain follow suite. The treatment of any knee ligament injury will require rest and rehabilitation. How long one must commit to the healing process will be determined by the severity of the injury. 

What are the ligaments of the knee?

Within the knee are three bones that serve to attach the knee joint to the thigh bone. Ligaments, which are strong band-like tissues, connect these three bones to each other, keeping the knee bone in place.
On the sides of the knee, inside and outside are the collateral ligaments. These serve to protect and control the knee as it moves sideways.

  • Inside Knee: Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL)
  • Outside Knee: Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL)

Forming a criss-cross inside the knee are the cruciate ligaments, they act to protect and control the motion of the knee as it moves back and forth.

  • Front of Knee: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL)
  • Back of Knee: Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL)

The knee is a relatively vulnerable region of the body, which suffers from injury frequently. When there is an injury to a knee ligament, it is usually referred to as a “sprain”. Sprains are graded by the severity of the injury. When injury does occur, it is a particularly timely process if the severity of the injury is significant. To hasten the recovery time, injury repair and recovery peptides may offer support.
 

Common Causes of Knee Ligament Injury

 

  • Sudden change of motion / direction or stopping suddenly
  • Pivoting with your foot stationary
  • A bad landing from a jump
  • A collision that causes a direct hit to the knee.

 

Prevent knee injury through proper training and exercise

To reduce the liklihood of sustaining a knee ligament injury, specific exercises and training techniques can be highly effective. Exercises that focus on promoting muscular strength within the leg are key to preventing further injury. One should practice landing from jumps, ensuring correct technical placement of the knee.  Training can also be focused on how best to stop, shift direction and pivot for injury prevention. Training this way means that eventually one’s landing technique and motion will become second nature.
Preventing a knee injury from occuring again, one should also commit to the specified healing time and not resume activity. Not giving yourself adequate time to repair, sets you up for further damage and a weakened constitution.
If you are interested in learning more about injury peptides that assist in the healing and recovery process, take a moment to fill in our registry to qualify for access.

References
  • Lam, M. H., Fong, D. T., Yung, P., Ho, E. P., Chan, W. Y., & Chan, K. M. (2009). Knee stability assessment on anterior cruciate ligament injury: Clinical and biomechanical approaches. Sports medicine, arthroscopy, rehabilitation, therapy & technology : SMARTT, 1(1), 20. doi:10.1186/1758-2555-1-20 
  • Published: Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 2017 Volume:47 Issue:11 Pages:824–824 DOI:10.2519/jospt.2017.0511 Knee Ligament Sprains and Tears: Clinical Practice Guidelines Ensuring Best Care
  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Clinical Presentation: History, Physical, Causes. (2018). Emedicine.medscape.com. Retrieved 14 November 2018, from https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/89442-clinical 
  • LaBella, C., Hennrikus, W., & Hewett, T. (2014). Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Prevention. PEDIATRICS, 133(5), e1437-e1450. doi:10.1542/peds.2014-0623 
  • Liu, Q., Jia, Z., Duan, L., Xiong, J., Wang, D., & Ding, Y. (2018). Functional peptides for cartilage repair and regeneration. American journal of translational research, 10(2), 501-510.
You might also like
Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

Sports Injury and Recovery What is a soft tissue injury? Soft tissue injury happens with regularity for both athletes and bodybuilding enthusiasts. A soft tissue injury usually involves a sprain, strain or bruising of the muscle, tendon or ligament. When an individual...

read more

Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

What is Soft Tissue Injury
Sports Injury and Recovery

What is a soft tissue injury?

Soft tissue injury happens with regularity for both athletes and bodybuilding enthusiasts. A soft tissue injury usually involves a sprain, strain or bruising of the muscle, tendon or ligament.
When an individual does not allow themselves adequate healing from a soft tissue injury, this can leave them vulnerable to further damage. It is essential to take the necessary precautions, the first time around, so no downtime is experienced. Nothing is worse than feeling like an injury is taking you further and further from your goals, or from the activities you enjoy in life.
What is soft tissue?

  • Muscles
  • Ligaments
  • Tendons
  • Nerves
  • Fat
  • Fascia
  • Fibrous Tissues
  • Synovial Membranes

For injury repair there are specific peptides found to be highly beneficial to those who like to keep active engaging in sports, bodybuilding and athletics. There are common soft tissue injuries which often take time to heal, listed below.

Common Soft Tissue Injury

  • Sprains
  • Strains
  • Contusions
  • Tendonitis
  • Bursitis

Tips to Prevent Soft Tissue Injury

Sometimes we forget the simplest things in the pursuit of what we actively enjoy. Here are some helpful tips to consider in the prevention of soft tissue injury.

  1. Warming up and cooling down

Before physical training/activity one must always warm up the body. Your muscles should have a good stretch before you begin working out. Be sure to also do a cool down upon completion of training with a thorough stretch of the muscles you have just trained.

  1. Play it smart – it is key to know your limit

There is a higher risk for experiencing soft tissue injury, when you are pushing your body beyond what is realistic. Do not take the risk. It is much smarter to work your way up to your goals with patience and care. Small increases in the intensity and duration of training is playing it safe and provides your body with respect it deserves, whilst minimising time lost in repair and recovery.

  1. Don’t underestimate the importance of cardio

Don’t forget to get in some cardio training. Building up ones cardiovascular strength will supply you with the fuel you need to fight fatigue. Most soft tissue injuries are experienced when an individual is over exhausted and lacking the power to keep going. Additionally, cardio benefits the individual through a decreased risk of stress and anxiety, depression, osteoporosis, high blood pressure and obesity.

  1. Allow adequate recovery time between training sessions

This goes without saying. It is in the recovery period that muscle hypertrophy takes place.

  1. Wear the appropriate clothing for your activity

Athletic footwear designers have a shoe for every sport and exercise. It is critical for one to obtain just the right support in the areas support is needed, such as added cushioning or traction. Whatever facilitates your ease of motion, or has been designed to improve or prevent injury, is a consideration you have and can act upon. Protective equipment such as mouth guards and helmets are other examples of how you can support your body while engaging in sport or physical training.

  1. Don’t forget to keep hydrated

Drink water before, during, and after physical activity.

  1. Injury recovery takes time

If you have experienced an injury, you must take time to heal. When you go back to training prematurely, the risk will leave you vulnerable to further injury. If the damage is severe, you may be inactive for up to 4 months. Healing time may be improved through the use of injury repair peptides.

  1. Peptide supplement for soft tissue injury

Peptides may provide relief to those suffering from soft tissue injuries. For further information fill in our obligation free registry to see if you qualify.

References
  • Kraemer, W., Denegar, C., & Flanagan, S. (2009). Recovery from injury in sport: considerations in the transition from medical care to performance care. Sports health, 1(5), 392-5.
  • Liu, Q., Jia, Z., Duan, L., Xiong, J., Wang, D., & Ding, Y. (2018). Functional peptides for cartilage repair and regeneration. American journal of translational research, 10(2), 501-510.
  • Järvinen, T. A., Järvinen, M., & Kalimo, H. (2014). Regeneration of injured skeletal muscle after the injury. Muscles, ligaments and tendons journal, 3(4), 337-45.
  • Liu, J., Saul, D., Böker, K., Ernst, J., Lehman, W., & Schilling, A. (2018). Current Methods for Skeletal Muscle Tissue Repair and Regeneration. Biomed Research International, 2018, 1-11. doi:10.1155/2018/1984879
  • HK, G. (2018). Advances in the basic and clinical applications of thymosin β4. – PubMed – NCBI . Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 7 November 2018, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26096726
  • G, K. (2018). Thymosin β4 Promotes Dermal Healing. – PubMed – NCBI . Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 7 November 2018, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27450738
  • Goldstein AL, e. (2018). Thymosin β4: a multi-functional regenerative peptide. Basic properties and clinical applications. – PubMed – NCBI . Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 7 November 2018, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22074294
You might also like
Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

Soft Tissue Injury Prevention

Sports Injury and Recovery What is a soft tissue injury? Soft tissue injury happens with regularity for both athletes and bodybuilding enthusiasts. A soft tissue injury usually involves a sprain, strain or bruising of the muscle, tendon or ligament. When an individual...

read more